What It Really Was Like to Cast ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ (VIDEO)

Project Casting

Have you ever wondered what it was like to work on the Avengers: Infinity War

Recently, casting director Alyssa from Central Casting broke down what it was like to cast, hire, and work on the box-office hit movie Avengers: Infinity War. 

Alyssa explained that casting stand-ins were a difficult job. “For Rocket, [production was] looking for someone who was a contortionist or very flexible because we needed our Stand-In to crab crawl for most of filming to be the right height,” Alyssa said. “For Thanos, who’s heavily CGI, our Stand-In had to use a motion capture suit, which almost looks like pajamas with dots all over them. There was never a dull moment when it came to casting Stand-Ins for this one.”

She added that it was important to get the look right for reach planet so they each uniquely stood out from the other worlds. “It was essential to hone in on the looks and the unique features [of each category] so we could really sell that they were a part of different planets,” Alyssa said. “For the alien types, like Gamora’s people and the Titans, they required heavy special effects makeup and prosthetics. A unique challenge there was to find men, and occasionally women, who were willing to shave their heads bald, as that makes the prosthetic application a lot easier.”

But for Alyssa its more than just a job its fun because she is also a Marvel fan.

“I’m a huge Marvel fan, my brother is actually the reason I started watching these movies, so I really owe it all to him,” she said. “When I first started prep on this project in 2016, I re-watched every single Marvel movie that had come out by that time. While they’re all amazing, Avengers: Infinity War is definitely my favorite, so if you haven’t watched it yet, make sure you get out to the theater to see what all the buzz is about.”

Check out the video below.

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