JetBlue Passenger Forced to Change After Wearing This

Project Casting

A JetBlue passenger was forced to change after crew decided her shorts were too short.

There may not be an official dress code for flights, but that doesn’t mean you can get away with wearing whatever you want. In fact, a JetBlue passenger learned the hard way earlier this week. According to reports, at Logan Airport a gate agent asked a young woman to change before being allowed to board her flight to Seattle. Maggie McMuffin, a Burlesque dancer in Seattle, says she was told she “needed to put something else on or I would not be allowed to board the flight.”

“I was told it was the pilot’s final say so these are not official rules that can be broken,” McMuffin told KIRO7 in Seattle. “I felt very disrespected.”

Since she didn’t have any other clothes, she found some $22 sleep trunks in an airport store, which she put on before boarding.

JetBlue is standing behind their crew’s dress-code rules, however they are reimbursing McMuffin for the cost of the trunks as well as a $200 flight voucher.

“The gate and on board crew discussed the customer’s clothing and determined that the burlesque shorts may offend other families on the flight,” a JetBlue spokesman told KIRO7.

“The gate and on board crew discussed the customer’s clothing and determined that the burlesque shorts may offend other families on the flight.”

“While the customer was not denied boarding, the crew members politely asked if she could change. The customer agreed and continued on the flight without interruption. We support our crew members’ discretion to make these difficult decisions, and we decided to reimburse the customer for the cost of the new shorts and offered a credit for future flight as a good will gesture.”

While there isn’t a dress code for JetBlue flights, the carrier’s contract of carriage does include a rule about a proper attire under the conditions in which a passenger would be refused.

“Persons whose conduct is or has been known to be disorderly, abusive, offensive, threatening, intimidating, violent, or whose clothing is lewd, obscene, or patently offensive,” it says.

Just like any night club across the United States, dress code is subjective, and whether or not you get on a flight to Los Angeles or NYC, may strongly depend on whether or not the gate agent approves of your fashion choices.

Via Kiro7

What do you think? Leave us a comment below.