10 Things You Did Not Know About the “Godzilla” Movie

Project Casting

Godzilla dominated the box office this weekend with reports that this is one of the biggest movie of 2014.

The Warner Bros. and Legendary Pictures reboot made a whopping $93 million dollars in the United States and an additional $10 million internationally for a total of $103 million in first weekend sale.

But did you know this was the 60th anniversary for Godzilla? The original movie was released in 1954.

There are a lot of little things you may have missed while watching the movie or happened behind the scenes. But, here are ten things you probably did not know about the latest Godzilla Movie.

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#1. Godzilla, Scars and Nuclear Bombs

Godzilla’s appearance was covered with scars. This feature was actually taken from the original Godzilla movie that featured Godzilla with keloid scars. In the 1950’s version, the use of scars was to remind the audience of the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, that left thousands of people scarred. This was to also enhance the concept behind Godzilla as a monster damaged by nuclear weapons.

#2. 60 long monstrous years.

This film is to release in 2014, Godzilla’s 60th anniversary.
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Photo Credit: Helga Esteb

#3. Sound Effects Testing had to be Just Right!

In order to create a loud monster like yell, the sound designers used a 12-foot-high, 18-foot-wide speaker array to blast Godzilla’s roar at a hundred thousand watts to get a good idea of his vocal power and strength.

#4. Cinematographer got lost and started working on the wrong set!

While filming for ‘Godzilla’ the Cinematographer Seamus McGarvey accidently went to the set of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” and he described walking around with his light meter, not recognizing anyone, as a “surreal, dreamlike experience” until he realized his mistake.
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#5. It would take a normal person 450 years just to create Godzilla on a computer.

There are 960 visual effects shot through the whole film, 327 of which are Godzilla whose 3D model is made up of over 500,000 shapes. If the computer graphics were designed on a single computer, it would have taken 450 years to render the entire project.

#6. Godzilla’s design was inspired by… Lions, Tigers, Bears… oh my?

Godzilla’s design was inspired by bears and Komodo dragons. The face was particularly based on the heads of bears, dogs, and eagles. Designers the eagle “has a lot of nobility, it made him feel very majestic and noble.”

#7. The Marines didn’t like the movie’s script.

The United States Navy co-operated in the making of the movie, while the United States Marine Corps declined to participate after reviewing the script.
Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com
Photo Credit: Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com

#8. Old school lenses

For the 1950s scenes, cinematographer Seamus McGarvey wanted “a peeled look with muted colors and diffused highlights.” To achieve this, he shot those scenes with vintage 1960s camera lenses and additionally had the shades of black in those scenes digitally tinted in magenta.

#9 Godzilla is an Anti-Hero similar to Walter White.

Director Gareth Edwards described Godzilla as an anti-hero: “Godzilla is definitely a representation of the wrath of nature. The theme is man versus nature and Godzilla is certainly the nature side of it. You can’t win that fight. Nature’s always going to win and that’s what the subtext of our movie is about. He’s the punishment we deserve.”

#10 There was a ton of research in order to make the movie!

Gareth Edwards and the design group reviewed all the previous incarnations of Godzilla’s design for influence on the final design for the film: “The way I tried to view it was: imagine Godzilla was a real creature and someone from Toho saw him in the 1950s and ran back to the studio to make a movie about the creature and was trying their best to remember and draw it… and in our film you get to see him for real. It was important that this felt like a Toho Godzilla.”
Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com
Helga Esteb / Shutterstock.com

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